Training Glossary

Please utilize the following glossary to better understand common terminology used at Triad Indoor Rowing.  You can click on some terms for further information.  Please let us know if you feel we've missed an important term/topic.

' - symbol for minute (time)

1/2 Slide- stroke technique, utilizing only 1/2 of the slide while rowing.  At the catch position, the shins are at a 45 degree angle to the slide.

1/4 Slide- stroke technique, utilizing only 1/4 of the slide while rowing.  At the catch position, the knees are only slightly flexed with shins at approximately a 22 1/2 degree angle to the slide.  Great for pregnant females who are limited in range of motion.

3/4 Slide- stroke technique, utilizing only 3/4 of the slide while rowing.  At the catch position, the knees are flexed considerably and the shins are at approximately a 67 1/2 degree angle to the slide.

Arms Only- stroke technique, consisting of rowing with just the arms, no body or legs.  From the finish position, release the arms until elbows are fully extended.  Next, while keeping the chain level, draw the elbows past the torso, bringing the handle into light contact with the middle of the torso.

Benchmark- common workout in the indoor rowing community.  Most benchmarks are scheduled three times a year for Triad Indoor Rowing members to perform

Body and Arms- stroke technique, consisting of rowing with just body and arms, no legs.  From the release position, pivot the torso from 11 to 1 o'clock position from the hips.  You are now at the catch position of body and arms rowing.  From the catch, begin by pivoting from the 1 to 11 o'clock position and draw the arms into the middle of the torso.

Body Only- stroke technique, consisting of rowing with just the body, no arms or legs.  From the release position, pivot the torso from 11 to 1 o'clock position from the hips.  You are now at the catch position of body only rowing.  From the catch, pivot from the 1 to 11 o'clock position aggressively to return to the release position.  This technique is usually performed with a much higher damper setting than used during workouts.

Calories- unit of measurement displayed by the PM, representing energy used to complete work

Catch- position within the rowing stroke in which you transition from the recovery phase to the drive phase.  It is called the 'catch' because when on-the-water, this is the moment within the rowing stroke in which you would first 'catch' the water with the blade of the oar.

Catch Drill- During the catch drill, the rowers should be instructed to catch on your command, anytime during the recovery. 'Catch drill, catch at my command, on this one'. This works on quickness at the catch (quick heels down, quick legs down) and on the anticipation of the catch. At any time during the recover, call, 'catch' and the rowers should drop the blades in and perform the drive, whether they are at quarter slide, arms away, etc... It is good to mix up the positions, some at the end, some at the beginning of the stroke. This way the rowers will learn to be quick.

CD- an acronym for cool-down.  A proper cool-down brings your heart rate and breathing back to normal, removes waste products (such as lactic acid), which can build up during vigorous activity, reduces the immediate post-exercise tendency for muscle spasm or cramping and reduces muscle soreness and stiffness.  Every Triad indoor Rowing workout ends with a proper cool-down.

Concept2 Affiliation - within your Concept2 Online Logbook, affiliate yourself with Triad Indoor Rowing to include your total meters rowed annually with the rest of the Triad Indoor Rowing members.  Our goal as an Affiliation is to reach and maintain top placing in the Health/Fitness division of the
Affiliation Standings.  Let's do this!

Concept2 Online Logbook - Concept2 Online Logbook allows you to record your workouts on the indoor rower or Concept2 SkiErg. You can keep track of your total meters, analyze your progress and compare your results against people from across the world.

Concept2 Team - within your Concept2 Online Logbook, as a member of the Triad Indoor Rowing Team, you can participate in two team challenges (World Erg Challenge, and Fall Team Challenge) held throughout the year. Note: Teams are separate from affiliations and are organized by a team captain.

Crash-B’s - CRASH-B Sprints was the host site of the World Indoor Rowing Championship for over 30 years.  The WIRC is now planned to be held in a different location each year to help spread the word about indoor rowing.

Cruise- rowing intensity, similar to steady state, where activity achieves a balance between the energy required by working muscles and the rate of oxygen and delivery for aerobic ATP production.  In common terms, this is the intensity in which you are able to maintain for a long time (ex: 60') and is measured by your 500m split (ex: 2:30/500m).  Everyone has a different Cruise, based upon their current rowing ability and level of fitness.  As you become a better Rower, your Cruise will improve as well, resulting in better performances.

Cruise Variations- utilizing Cruise and simple math, Triad Indoor Rowing is able to program consistent and specific workout intensities.  Cruise variations consist of anything from Cruise -20 to Cruise +20.  For example, if your Cruise is 2:20/500m, then Cruise -20 = 2:00/500m, Cruise -5 = 2:15/500m, Cruise +15 = 2:35/500m, etc.

Damper- the lever on the side of the flywheel housing, or fan cage, that controls how much air flows into the cage. The fan cages are numbered so you can set the damper lever to a particular value from 1–10, indicating how much air is drawn into the cage on each stroke:

Drive- phase of the rowing stroke beginning at the catch position and ending at the finish position.  The Rowers movement throughout the drive is sequenced legs, body, arms or more specifically, knee extension, hip extension, elbow flexion.

Drive Drill- drill used to improve stroke technique, focusing on correct sequencing of the movements within the drive phase of the rowing stroke.  Drill consists of: Legs Only, Legs and Body and Full Slide techniques.

EMOM- acronym for every minute, on the minute.  This means that, with respect to a timer, at the start of every minute, perform _____.  For example... 5' EMOM of Power 10's @ 24 s/m means at 0:00 perform a Power 10 @ 24 s/m, then rest.  At 1:00, perform another Power 10 @ 24 s/m, then rest.  Continuing until ending with a Power 10 @ 24 s/m at 4:00.

Erg - trade name for the indoor rower.  Short for Ergometer, which means, 'an apparatus that measures work or energy expended during a period of physical exercise'.

ErgData - free application designed to run on iOS and Android devices connected to a Performance Monitor. Once connected, ErgData provides additional performance statistics, stores and displays your workout results, and uploads your results to the Concept2 Online Logbook. It also offers the enhanced visibility of a backlit display.  

Exaggerated Recovery Drill- practice used to reduce rushing the recovery by taking 6-10 seconds to complete the recovery phase of the stroke.  Focus should be on positioning and time throughout the recovery

Eyes Closed Rowing- technique used to focus on 'the feel' of the stroke.  Some say that when you take away a sense, the others get stronger.  Many Rowers find this to be true!

Finish- position within the rowing stroke in which the drive ends and recovery begins.  It is called the 'finish' because, at this point in time, the rowing stroke's drive is complete.  Knees are extended, torso is at an 11 o'clock position via the hips, elbows drawn past the torso and the handle making light contact with the middle of the torso.

Foot Stretchers- part of the erg where the Rower's feet attach.  Either strapped in or strapless, the feet remain in the foot stretchers throughout the rowing stroke.  Being adjustable, the foot stretchers should be adjusted so that the strap crosses the ball of the foot.

Force Curve- display features of the PM.  The Force Curve graphically represents how you apply force (or power) during the rowing stroke, indicating how your total force varies as you use your legs, back and arms during the drive:
     -the smoother the curve, the smoother the application of force.
     -the larger the area under the curve, the greater the amount of force applied.

Full Slide- rowing technique, consisting of utilizing the full slide while rowing.  Also known as normal rowing.  At the catch position, the shins are at a 90 degree angle to the slide.

Hip Hinges- accessory movement used to strengthen the Rower's core.   While maintaining neutral lumbar curve and head position, hinge as far back as possible from the hips.  Then reverse the movement and hinge forward to the 1 o'clock position.  Be sure to limit your range of motion to just before losing lumbar position.

Interval- unit of measurement used by Triad Indoor Rowing and the PM to distinguish between periods of work.

Legs Only-  stroke technique, consisting of rowing with just the legs, no body or arms.  From the catch position, while maintaining a 1 o'clock position of the upper body, push with the feet into the foot stretchers. Once the knees are fully extended, begin to slowly recover to the catch position.  

Legs and Body-  stroke technique, consisting of rowing with just the legs and body, no arms.  From the catch position, while maintaining a 1 o'clock position of the upper body, push with the feet into the foot stretchers aggressively. As the knees are finishing their extension, allow the body to hinge from the hips so that the upper body finishes in the 11 o'clock position.  Begin to slowly recover to the catch position.  

Left/Right Arm Row- stroke technique, consisting of rowing with one arm only.  Performed by either gripping the handle in the middle slots with the fingers or holding the inner portion of one side of the handle and 'pointing' the opposite end forwards.  Know that some Rowers have no other choice but to row with one arm all the time.

Meters- unit of measurement for distance of the PM

No-Handle Row- stroke technique, used as a light intensity accessory movement, focusing on torso position throughout the rowing stroke.  Without holding the handle, hold your hands up as if you were holding the handle.  As you row, focus on the position and timing of the stroke.

Open Row- opportunity for the Rower to be creative and decide for themselves at what rate and pressure to row

Pace- rate at which you row.  Most often measured/discussed using 500m split, but can also be displayed as watts or calories/hour

Pace Boat- display feature of the PM, used to display a virtual boat that can be programmed to perform a specific pace or repeat a historical performance.

Paddle- very light rowing intensity used as active recovery.  To relate to on-the-water, you simply want to 'keep the boat straight' with no emphasis on forward momentum.  Be sure to still practice excellent stroke technique.

Pause Drill- practice used to improve positioning and timing of the stroke.  Rowers will pause/stop rowing at a specific position within the stroke, analyzing body position when paused.  The pause can be called for at any position: Finish, 1 o'clock, 1/4 Slide, etc.

Pick Drill- practice used to improve stroke technique, focusing on correct sequencing of the movements within the rowing stroke.  Drill consists of: Arms Only, Body and Arms, 1/4 Slide, 1/2 Slide, 3/4 Slide and Full Slide rowing.

PM- an acronym for Performance Monitor,the measurement and display device of the erg

Power 5,10,20, etc.- 'Power' means max pressure.  So a Power 5 would call for 5 strokes at max pressure.  If there is no change in stroke rating called for, be sure to increase the recovery phase of the stroke due to the drive phase being shorter in time duration.

Pressure- the application of force into the foot stretchers via leg extension

Progressive Pause Drill- This drill is the ultimate in correcting problems with the set. It is essentially the same as the pause drill, except that the location of the pause changes each stroke. The sequence starts at the finish. 'Progressive pause drill, pause at the finish, on this one'. Then when you call 'row', the rowers come up to the catch, take a stroke, and then pause at the next pause in the cycle. The pauses are at: the finish, arms away, bodies over, 1/4 slide, 1/2 slide, 3/4 slide. Don't pause at the catch on this drill. At the last step, pausing at 3/4 slide, the rowers come up to the catch, take the drive, and then pause at the finish and repeat the cycle. Because the pause keeps on shifting, it's easy for the rowers to forget what part of the stroke they're supposed to pause at. Tell them at the catch, 'Row..., at the finish, on this one. Row..., at arms and bodies over, on this one.'

Pyramid- workout structure consisting of ascending, then descending details.

Rate- see S/M

Recovery- phase of the rowing stroke beginning at the finish position and ending at the catch position.   The Rowers movement throughout the recovery is sequenced arms, body, legs or more specifically, elbow extension, hip flexion, knee flexion.

Release- position within the rowing stroke.  Immediately following arriving at the Finish position, 'release' the handle from the torso by extending the elbows while maintaining the 11 o'clock position of the torso.

Rest- a workout intensity, consisting of either not rowing or continuing to row at Paddle intensity for active recovery.

Rower- you are the Rower, not the indoor rower, that's the erg.

S/M - also called rating, s/m is displayed by the PM and is the measurement of how many strokes per minute you are rowing at, at the moment.

Score- every Triad Indoor Rowing workout performance results in a ''score', which is a numerical value associated with your performance.  For example, the 2k's score is time required to row a 2k.

Split- set of even segments along a workout, providing data on how pace changed throughout the workout.

Sprint - rowing intensity, consisting of rowing at max pressure and max rating.

Sprint Start- rowing technique, providing an efficient and productive start to a short workout.  The goal of the sprint start is to get the flywheel spinning really fast by efficiently expending energy through a series of strokes at partial slide lengths.  For example: Sprint Start sequence of the following slide lengths at max pressure: 3/4, 1/2, 1//2, 3/4, full, full. Next, depending on current fitness level, the Rower may either continue a few strokes at max pressure or immediately settle into the pace for the workout.

Static hold- holding a single position without any movement

Strapless Rowing- stroke technique, foregoing the use of the foot stretchers straps.  Used to
    -practice not rushing the slide during recovery
    -preventing excessive layback in the finish position
    -building pressure smoothly instead of exploding at the catch

Stretching - two types of stretching, static and dynamic, are are regularly practiced by Rowers.  In general, a light row of 3-5 minutes should be performed before any static stretching is performed.  Another popular practice is to stretch dynamically pre-workout and statically post-workout.

Stroke- the rowing stroke consists of the: Catch, Drive, Finish and Recovery.  The intensity of the rowing stroke is determined by the many combinations of technique, pressure and rating.

Watts- unit of measurement displayed by the PM, used to measure the power exerted in the previous stroke

WO- an acronym for workout.  Triad Indoor Rowing workouts are seldom, but regularly repeated.  All workouts are performed two times/year with exception of many Benchmarks which are performed three times/year.  The majority of workouts, combined with warm-up and cool-down, take one 45'- 1 hour to complete.

WU- an acronym for warm-up.  Warm-up activity serves two major purposes—to enhance performance and prevent injury. Consequently, a warm-up is both physical and mental.  Every Triad Indoor Rowing workout begins with a relevant and adequate warm-up.